Estate Planning for a Second Marriage

For many couples, estate planning in a first marriage can be stressful and difficult enough.  In the event of a divorce or death, estate planning for second marriages can be even harder. Why? Because a second marriage can produce different goals regarding inheritances, financial planning, long-term care, and much more.  Understanding some of the key

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Consequences of Not Probating a Will

If you’ve been named executor of someone’s estate, unless you resign, following the decedent’s death, you must submit the will to the court and initiate the probate process. But what happens if you don’t?   If the deceased possessed property or incurred debts, the consequences of failing to probate a will can be quite severe, both

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Can a trustee be removed from a trust?

Can a trustee be removed from a trust? Trusts are one of the most critical and versatile estate planning tools. Not only do trusts enable individuals to pass on their property and financial accounts without having to go through probate, but they also can provide enhanced disability planning during their lifetime, protect assets for future

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6 Common Problems with Deeds on Death, Transfer on Death Deeds, and Beneficiary Deeds

Common Problems with Deeds on Deaths

6 Common Problems with Deeds on Death, Transfer on Death Deeds, and Beneficiary Deeds If you wish to transfer your real estate to beneficiaries at your time of death without the costly probate process or using a living trust, you should consider a deed on death, transfer on death deeds, or beneficiary deeds.  This method

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Estate Planning Goals & Objectives for 2022

Estate Planning Goals and Objectives for 2022

The start of a new year brings about renewed energy towards accomplishing goals, but how often do we tend to fizzle out only after a few short months? If one of your goals for 2022 is to finalize your estate planning needs you will want to set some realistic expectations and guidelines for achieving these

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The Ins and Outs of the Maryland Inheritance Tax.

Maryland is one of only six states that levies an inheritance tax. (Maryland also imposes an estate tax, making it the only state to levy both.)   The good news is that close relatives are typically exempt from Maryland inheritance tax, and with proper planning, an experienced Maryland estate planning attorney may be able to

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How to Avoid Probate in Maryland.

There are several reasons why you might want your estate to avoid Maryland probate after you pass away. The probate process can be frustrating, time-consuming, and costly. In addition, probate is a public process, meaning anybody can get information about your debts, creditors, assets, and more. Probate can also take a very long time complete,

Contesting a Will in Maryland.

Wills are contested more often than you might imagine. This is why it is so important to have an experienced Maryland estate planning attorney design and implement your will and other crucial legal documents.   Let’s begin with a quick definition. When a person “contests” a will, he or she is asking the court to

What are Revocable Living Trusts in Maryland?

Understanding the Portability of the Estate Tax Exemption

Revocable living trusts are estate planning documents that can give the grantor (the person for whom the trust is created) complete control over his or her assets during life, in the event of in capacity, and after death.   Unlike a will, a revocable living trust is a legal entity that can own property. The

Who Inherits Property In Maryland If There’s No Will?

what is elder law

When a person passes away without a will (or, in the case of certain assets, without designated beneficiaries), the decedent’s assets are distributed according to what is known as intestate succession. In this situation, “who gets what” follows strict guidelines established by the state of Maryland. Broadly speaking, these guidelines mandate that assets be distributed

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